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Update: read our latest guide from this programme, communicating energy with the centre-right.

This guide is intended for communicators and campaigners from across the political spectrum who would like to learn new ways of talking about climate change in ways that resonate with centre-right voters, particularly in the context of an election.

It explores the following:

  • What the centre-right thinks about climate change

  • Centre-right values and finding the right words

  • 4 narratives that can work with the centre-right

  • Establishing communicator trust

  • What not to say

  • Election tips

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One response to “How to talk climate change with the centre-right – An election guide

  1. I found your election guide on how to talk climate change with the centre-right very interesting – it’s an extremely useful contribution to help discuss these issues with a group of the public which has been largely ignored by environmentalists in the past – except as a target to attack. I have one criticism, however: climate change policies are often attacked by the right as being too expensive and hitting the people who can least afford them hardest, as making the country uncompetitive by increasing our costs, etc. The UKIP manifesto (page 38) is a good example of this. Yet, I didn’t see any arguments to counter the cost issue explicitly in your document. Is this something you think could be added, or have I missed something?